There are two ways to do this.

  1. You could pick one off the shelf.  Chances are you would end up with a nice accessory that will even out harsh light and glare to a very acceptable degree.  It may even leave you with change in your pocket.  Or,
  2. You could talk to Vicky at Rowe’s.

I highly recommend the Vicky option, and here’s why.  I didn’t realize how much I didn’t know about polarizers until I talked with her. What I found out is, it’s all about the glass.

The glass used to construct lenses (optical glass) is chosen for its ability to allow light to enter through the aperture to reach the camera sensor, hopefully with little-to-no distortion.  This involves properties like refraction, reflection, transmission, and absorption, things I should have learned — but didn’t — in undergrad physics courses.  Suffice it to say that any glass that is going to accomplish these things in the proper percentages is going to be very expensive indeed.  However, even that is not enough, according to Vicky, to ensure excellent lens performance. Most lens glass, she said, is multicoated to improve clarity, reduce reflection, and increase transmission of light so that more of it is directed to the sensor.

s-l640So, what does this have to do with a polarizer filter?  Everything.  Because once you have selected (and paid for) a lens equipped with the best glass you can afford, why ruin it by applying a filter made of inferior glass?  Any photo will only be as good as the glass it passes through, and that includes the glass used in any filters you screw on to the lens.  So, do your research and be sure any filters you buy are constructed of lens-grade glass,

I ended up with this really nice low-profile, multicoated Schott-glass filter by Promaster.  A little more than I wanted to spend, but not as much as what I *could* have spent.  Waiting for a bright sunny day to try it out!

DSCN6146Thank you, Vicky!

 

 

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